An impulse buy for your fire-starting kit

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I found this near the checkout at a local grocery store last night. I had been thinking about a small/travel-size container for petroleum jelly for the fire kit. This is the size I have been looking for. It was 97 cents. It seems to be a good quick buy item if you’re getting last minute provisions before going out to the field. In a disaster situation, these should go fairly quickly after the milk, bread, and D-cell batteries.

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Preparing for the Winter Bug-in

3-Day BagIn the last five years I’ve had to spend a couple of nights at the hotel across the street from my job. Texas doesn’t handle really cold winters well. A good three day snow can shut us down while places like Ohio would be bustling with plows and salt and the roads would be open again in a few hours. They’re used to that. While we’re used to triple-digit summers.

February gave us our first and last inclement weather days and a couple of us camped out in the hotel Thursday and Friday nights. By the weekend the slushy stuff had melted and dried and we were left with the sandy/salty stuff all over the place including our cars.

I usually keep a duffel bag of clothes and a toiletry kit in my car year-round. I didn’t restock it after the days 9 months ago. I think I still had one change of clothes where I usually keep two. I reloaded it on Labor Day because of the chance that we might have to evac. because of the fires. Now the fires were quite a ways down the road and the chance of us needing to leave was very remote. But I’d have to help other people get their stuff together and that process would go more smoothly if mine is already taken care of.

We were still baking then so I didn’t pack any winter stuff. Now that we’re finally in November I decided to get the bag ready for the cold. I’m not packing for a bug out situation. The ice usually clears up in a couple of days and I’m betting that society and the economy will be as intact as they are now.

Bag Contents:

2 changes of clothing
Several pairs of socks
Several pairs of underwear
Belt
Suspenders
Toiletry kit
Knit hat
Scarf
Gloves

I keep a first aid kit in my messenger bag but I’m going to start adding first aid supplies to the toiletry kit. I’ll also be adding meds and supplements plus some protein bars and the extra stainless water bottle.

Again this is for what Nutnfancy would call ROL or Rule of Law times. I still need to put together a full 72 hour kit. I probably need a few more items and a backpack that can hold it. The thing is in an evac. situation you don’t want to have to repack a bunch of stuff that is already packed.

The Demographics of Bugging Out

Part of my longterm plan is to buy some land in a rural setting, build a house on it and move there when I retire. My time frame is 7-10 years. I’m not sure how far along we’ll be in the true recovery from the depression we’re falling into. But I hope to be paying less property tax and zero urban-ness. I’ve been in cities all my adult life and I want something different for my future.
We lived for five years in a small town in Southern California. It was the mid-1970s and we were part of a very small minority. We didn’t always feel welcome in that town. I moved back to Texas when I was 16 and have only visited there twice since then. The town has changed and grown a lot. Some of the attitudes are probably still there.
Wide open spaces and clear skies have always attracted me. Now that I have so many working years behind me and less ahead I wish I had made building a life under those skies my goal when I was first starting out. Now it’s a race. Now it’s cramming for finals.

When I think of everything that goes into selecting a couple of acres and building a life there, all the building materials and physical labor are worthless if I am not part of the community. I need to know who are my neighbors and whether I am going to be able to fit in the town. I’ve never been a social butterfly and I definitely have some of the urban psychological quirks that stand out in a country setting. I’ll have to get over that stuff.

A good way to do this is to pick a spot and visit there…spend a week. How do people act around me when the horn honks because I double-tapped the lock button on the remote? What are the restaurants like, the theaters, bars, churches? I really haven’t tried, but I don’t think there is a website that profiles communities based on their receptiveness to outsiders. How accepting are the residents of different races. I guess you could gather statistics. And GOD knows there is enough crap on that census form. I hope that question doesn’t end up on there for 2020.

Right now I am going to continue my training and purchasing as many storage items as I can. I’ll pick out ten places to visit and plan on visiting those in the coming year or two. A lot of this will depend on my financial situation. The job is still there for the time being but as we saw last week that could change overnight from the standpoint of the worker.

Winter Preps Almost Complete

I keep a bag with roughly three changes of clothes and a shaving kit in the back of the car. This is mainly for when it ices over and my company has people staying in the nearby hotels. The only time I have had to use it was in January of 2007 when most of the city was shut down due to an ice storm. The last three winters have been much milder. I have a feeling we’re going to get hit sometime in the next two months. So the bag is packed and all I need to get together is water, food and cash but I’ll get those together over the next few weeks.