Part 2 of my interview on the MindShift podcast

I continue my talk with Dr. Clint Heacock of the MindShift podcast recently. We discuss biblical inerrancy, its origins and implications in today’s church, as well as a bit of my story. Here is part 2:

On PodBean:
MindShift, 8 Dec. 2017

On iTunes:
MindShift, 8 Dec. 2017

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Part 1 of my interview on the MindShift podcast

It was my honor to talk with Dr. Clint Heacock of the MindShift podcast recently. We discuss biblical inerrancy, its origins and implications in today’s church, as well as a bit of my story. Here is part 1:

On PodBean:
MindShift, 8 Dec. 2017

On iTunes:
MindShift, 8 Dec. 2017

‘Authoritative’ translation

Note: I wrote this prior to leaving Christianity.

In the centuries since the King James Version was authorized in 1611, many have come to refer to it as the “authoritative” translation. This notion of authoritativeness is so pervasive that many hold the KJV in higher esteem than the Hebrew and Greek texts from which it was translated.

There was a time when a grade-school education included a certain amount of Latin, Hebrew and Greek. We left that a long way back…decades before our modern public education system. Now, we’re lucky if the kid makes it to graduation, and can function in English. But I digress.

Since the ancient languages aren’t taught in school, they’re not taught at home. This means that several generations of kids have grown up in Christian homes not knowing how to study the Bible in the ancient languages. This only increases the reliance on translation.

The reality is there is no such thing as an “authoritative” translation.

None.

It does not exist, except as an emotion-laden idea in the minds of many Christians.

It’s an idea, a notion, a myth. A widely- and closely-held belief. That’s all.

The message is the authority. How it is presented is another issue. Assuming the presentation itself is the authority is unhealthy.

The original writings from which we get the biblical text, whether they be on scrolls or tablets, probably don’t exist anymore. They’ve been duplicated by thousands of scribes over the centuries and whatever documents survive are most likely copies. So while we speak of Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek being the original languages, the resource materials we employ for study are not those original documents.

With all that said, read your bible. Study it. Put a cover on it. Use highlighters. Write stuff in the margins. But understand that it is a tool, not an object of worship.

Observations

WHAT WAS WILL BE AGAIN

cant eat bibles 640Africa…Repeatedly bought, sold, carved up, divided, conquered, converted, looted, corrupted, occupied, experimented on, mined, enslaved, owned, co-opted, defiled, plundered, invaded, manipulated, robbed, poisoned, indebted, and ruled over for millennia.

When she’s given up her last crumbs of her uranium, gold, diamond, or tantalum for our precious electronics, when she’s finally worn out her usefulness you’ll find that her people cannot eat what’s left behind…not guns or bombs, not Bibles or Qurans, or condoms.

A long, long time ago, before the outsiders, we prospered, and some day, after the world has fallen from its insatiable incest of debt slavery and fiat money, when its decadence, debauchery, aggression, and acquisitiveness bring it to the ground once and for all, we will prosper again.