Quiet snipping

Fiskars
StaySharp Max Reel Mower by Fiskars.

When I was little in the late 60s/early 70s I remember my grandmother pushing one of these around the yard. It sounded like a bunch of scissors snipping away at the grass. By the time I was old enough to be taught how to mow the lawn she’d taken ill and sold the mower to the maintenance guy who helped out around the neighborhood sometimes.

Honestly I don’t know what my carbon footprint is. I suspect it’s no larger than most people living in the States. I drive a gasoline powered car. I eat and drink out of plastic and aluminum. I have petroleum based cleaning products around the house. I’m slowly working to clean all that up. Slowly. I’ve been replacing the CFL bulbs with LED. I use plant-based soap in the shower and an organic toothpaste. I am not able to purchase a new vehicle right now. Something newer should run more efficiently.

A few months back I was driving through my mother’s neighborhood and I saw one of her neighbors using one of these that he’d picked up at one of the big box hardware stores. It’s the Fiskars 18 Inch StaySharp Max Reel Mower. I like it. It makes a similar quiet snipping sound to what I remember from 50 years ago. It took a couple of passes and a bit longer to cut the front yard. The thing is, this isn’t about speed and convenience. There’s more than enough of that in the world.

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Grounding

wpid-img_20150815_172729.jpgThis past Saturday was the first time I’ve walked around on the ground barefoot probably in over 20 years. I’m not a swimmer and I’m usually wearing shoes everywhere. From what I understand from a few podcasts and videos is that this “detachment” from the planet has our energy fields being perturbed by the wiring in buildings, static electricity, and electric fields from whatever devices we spend time around. All that is happening without being reset. The way to reset it is to be in contact with the earth.

So many contacts. So little time.

CrowdIt’s people clutter, contact clutter…a digital throng.

I have 966 “friends” on Facebook. At one point I had over 1000. Compared to folks with over 4K I guess that’s kinda small. I started unfriending folks with the intent of reducing the number to 400. I decided, recently, that even that is too many people. You can only cut contacts one at a time. There is no bulk action. Facebook wants you to build that pile of 4-5,000 contacts so they can hit them up with ads and other junk.

The ice-aged slowness of the standard Facebook friend-removal process being what it is, I opened a new account and I am adding people from my old one. I plan to stop at around 300. That should cover people I know plus closer internet acquaintances. The rest are mostly folks who, other than a couple of Facebook database entries, I don’t know at all.

But they haven’t done anything!!!

No. They haven’t. No one I’m excluding has “done anything.” It’s not personal. It’s a matter of numbers. If I only know half the folks I’m friends with and many of those I have not seen since high school, I could go back to not being in contact with those who have not interacted with me other than accepting a friend request. I am also guilty of not interacting. Part of the problem is the amount of traffic that one thousand people generate in one day of a news feed. Think about that and then multiply it by 5 for folks with FIVE THOUSAND “friends.” I am not watching the thing all day long and I may not have seen the new pics of you and your new fur-kid, Mr. Puggins.

I’ll keep the other account active for a while and see if anyone I’ve not added to the new one notices my absence or lack of activity. Then at some point I’ll deactivate it as that appears to be the only way to close a Facebook account.