Identifying the problem

7 years ago I was at a friend’s house for their son’s HS graduation party. The group consisted of my friends, their families, and some of their neighbors and other friends. I’ve had a sort of rolling dislike of some of their neighbors and the way they seem to give them a revolving door invite to their house. Regardless, not my house, not my rules. It’s just something I have to put up with when I visit them.

So one of the neighbors from a few houses down is a loudmouthed non-stop talker. I didn’t identify this as extroversion or as anything more than annoying, loudmouthed non-stop talker. I couldn’t sit down and just drink a beer without him in high-speed verbal broadcast for probably an hour. Finally the guests were mostly either inside or out talking on the front lawn and I went in the garage and sat down with my beer.

Then the mom, who assumes that if you’re alone at a party you’re not having fun, (Introvert Pet Peeve #712) asks me if i’m “all right.” At the time I did not understand anything about being introvert other than the fact that I am one. So I didn’t understand that my being tired was somewhat due to being around too many people without a break, plus the motormouth idiot. So I blamed the beer. It was not my brand or the type I usually order.

If I had a chance to do that event over, I’d have told her, “yeah, I’m fine, I just need a few minutes.”

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Xenoform

I’d like to think that the public understands that food from living things contains DNA. I’d also like to think that the public understands that food from GMO crops also contains DNA and that the genes aren’t all from that species. Maybe they do. Maybe they don’t. When I say not all from the same species I mean that what we’re dealing with is a xenomorphic combination. That is a combination of DNA from two distinct species at the dna_molecule_on_platekingdom or phylum level. It’s where genetic material from a fish are added to corn. There is a reason it’s called “Frankencorn.”

The headlines about people supposedly not wanting DNA in their food refer to a story that emerged a few months ago about a survey conducted by Oklahoma State University. Two of the questions have to do with food labeling. The first asked if the people polled were in favor of or opposed to mandatory labels on foods containing DNA. The second asked if the people polled were in favor of or opposed to mandatory labels on foods produced with genetic engineering. The first question is badly written, confusing, clickbaity, and it is the source of the headlines. It’s a deceptive technique.

People deserve to have the food they purchase labeled and that labeling should include whether or not it has been genetically modified, and what foreign DNA sources were used in the modification.