So many contacts. So little time.

CrowdIt’s people clutter, contact clutter…a digital throng.

I have 966 “friends” on Facebook. At one point I had over 1000. Compared to folks with over 4K I guess that’s kinda small. I started unfriending folks with the intent of reducing the number to 400. I decided, recently, that even that is too many people. You can only cut contacts one at a time. There is no bulk action. Facebook wants you to build that pile of 4-5,000 contacts so they can hit them up with ads and other junk.

The ice-aged slowness of the standard Facebook friend-removal process being what it is, I opened a new account and I am adding people from my old one. I plan to stop at around 300. That should cover people I know plus closer internet acquaintances. The rest are mostly folks who, other than a couple of Facebook database entries, I don’t know at all.

But they haven’t done anything!!!

No. They haven’t. No one I’m excluding has “done anything.” It’s not personal. It’s a matter of numbers. If I only know half the folks I’m friends with and many of those I have not seen since high school, I could go back to not being in contact with those who have not interacted with me other than accepting a friend request. I am also guilty of not interacting. Part of the problem is the amount of traffic that one thousand people generate in one day of a news feed. Think about that and then multiply it by 5 for folks with FIVE THOUSAND “friends.” I am not watching the thing all day long and I may not have seen the new pics of you and your new fur-kid, Mr. Puggins.

I’ll keep the other account active for a while and see if anyone I’ve not added to the new one notices my absence or lack of activity. Then at some point I’ll deactivate it as that appears to be the only way to close a Facebook account.

Advertisements

Photos vs keeping stuff around

Sylvia HernandezThis is Sylvia Hernandez. I worked with her for a couple of years until she was murdered on a Saturday in 1998. This is the photo that was on her work ID. I had a printout of it with some papers. We weren’t really close but her death hit everyone pretty hard. Instead of keeping the printout I took a picture of it and threw out the printout with the rest of the papers. I’m doing the same thing with some things I take to sell or donate. I got the idea from Bruce Sterling’s Last Viridian Note where he says, “You should document these things. Take their pictures, their identifying makers’ marks, barcodes, whatever, so that you can get them off eBay or Amazon if, for some weird reason, you ever need them again.” I don’t intend on purchasing most of this stuff again. In fact I haven’t made that many photos compared to the amount of junk I’ve removed from here. Space is priceless.